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Complete Health Indicator Report of Hypospadias

Definition

Number of children born with hypospadias per 10,000 live male births to women residing in New Jersey in a specified time interval.

Numerator

Number of children born with hypospadias among live male infants born to women residing in New Jersey.

Denominator

Count of all live male births to women residing in New Jersey in a specified time interval.

Why Is This Important?

Hypospadias is a fairly common birth defect in boys in which the opening of the urethra (where urine comes out) is located on the underside of the penis, instead of at the tip. In most instances, no cause can be identified but a number of hypotheses related to environmental agents interfering with androgens have been suggested. Endocrine disrupting chemicals are among the possible agents suggested to contribute to causing this birth defect. There also may be an increased risk of hypospadias in infant males born to older women, or to women who used in vitro fertilization (IVF) to conceive.

Available Services

Early Intervention System: The New Jersey Early Intervention System (NJEIS), under the Division of Family Health Services, implements New Jersey's statewide system of services for infants and toddlers, birth to age three, with developmental delays or disabilities, and their families. The Department of Health (NJDOH) is appointed by the Governor as the state lead agency for the Early Intervention System. [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/eis] Since 2008, NJEIS has regionalized the system's point of entry for referral of children, birth to age three, with developmental delays and disabilities. Families and health care providers can call 1-888-653-4463 to refer a child to the NJEIS. NJDOH Family Health Services Case Management Units: Each of New Jersey's 21 counties has a Special Child Health Services (SCHS) Case Management Unit. SCHS Case Managers, with parental consent, work with the child's parents and physicians to evaluate an affected child's strengths and needs; and develop an individual service plan for the child and family. Medical, educational, developmental, social and financial needs of the child and family are targeted. NJ Department of Health, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, PO Box 364, Trenton, NJ 08625-0364, Phone: (609) 984-0755, website: [http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/sch/] Catastrophic Illness Relief Fund: The Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund is a financial assistance program for New Jersey families whose children have serious illnesses or conditions not covered by insurance, state or federal programs, or other funding sources. Contact the Catastrophic Illness in Children Relief Fund Program: 1-800-335-FUND (3863)

Data Tables


Prevalence of Hypospadias in Male Children Born to NJ Resident Mothers, Statewide Rates, 2000-2019

YearRate per 10,000 Live Male BirthsNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 20
200068.340459,154
200171.6242559,337
200275.7444658,884
200375.2444959,678
200479.4246458,422
200576.7544758,244
200681.6348058,802
200791.3653959,000
200872.6941857,508
200980.9145556,234
201075.7641254,382
201176.7141554,100
201272.6938452,826
201375.0939352,335
201477.4240652,438
201569.5436451,913
201679.6641852,474
201778.6940951,974
201873.1737851,664
201971.0536351,093

Data Sources

  • Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health
  • Early Identification and Monitoring Program, [https://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/sch/ Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services], Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health


Prevalence of Hypospadias in Male Children Born to NJ Resident Mothers, by County, 2010-2019

CountyRate per 10,000 Live Male BirthsNumer- atorDenom- inator
Record Count: 22
Atlantic74.1411615,646
Bergen67.6532047,299
Burlington100.2922722,635
Camden68.6521931,900
Cape May89.47394,359
Cumberland32.603310,123
Essex61.1032052,372
Gloucester87.9613315,121
Hudson65.0734052,250
Hunterdon86.64414,732
Mercer59.1912521,120
Middlesex69.2633748,659
Monmouth69.5320930,057
Morris133.1632024,032
Ocean70.1330343,204
Passaic69.5124334,958
Salem52.85183,406
Somerset82.5814117,074
Sussex124.70796,335
Union84.5429334,657
Warren76.48374,838
New Jersey74.183,893524,777

References and Community Resources

Statewide and county profiles of the most prevalent birth defects can be found at, [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/bdr/datum/] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, [http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/index.html] March of Dimes Foundation, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, askus@marchofdimes.com, [http://www.marchofdimes.com], Tel: 914-428-7100, 888-MODIMES (663-4637), Fax: 914-428-8203 National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD), P.O. Box 1968, 55 Kenosia Avenue, Danbury, CT 06813-1968, orphan@rarediseases.org, [http://www.rarediseases.org], Tel: 203-744-0100, Voice Mail 800-999-NORD (6673), Fax: 203-798-2291

Page Content Updated On 10/29/2021, Published on 11/04/2021
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Thu, 11 August 2022 19:12:30 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

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