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Complete Health Indicator Report of Deaths due to Unintentional Poisoning

Definition

Deaths with unintentional poisoning by and exposure to noxious substances as the underlying cause of death. '''''This includes, but is not limited to, opioids and other drugs.'''''[[br]] ICD-10 codes: X40-X49 (includes poisoning by legal and illegal drugs, alcohol, gases and vapors such as carbon monoxide and automobile exhaust, pesticides, and other chemicals and noxious substances)

Numerator

Number of deaths due to unintentional poisoning

Denominator

Total number of persons in the population

Why Is This Important?

Every day in the U.S., an average of 240 people die as a result of unintentional poisoning and 4,900 others are treated in emergency departments (2020 data).[http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html ^1^] Unintentional poisoning deaths in the United States increased nearly sevenfold between 2000 and 2020.[https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html ^2^]

Healthy People Objective: Prevent an increase in the rate of poisoning deaths: Unintentional or undetermined intent among all persons

U.S. Target: 11.1 deaths per 100,000 population
State Target: is not comparable because it does not include poisoning deaths of undetermined intent

Other Objectives

'''Healthy New Jersey 2020 Objective IVP-6''': Reduce the age-adjusted death rate due to unintentional poisoning to 6.8 in the total population, 8.6 among Whites and Blacks, and 3.1 among Hispanics.

How Are We Doing?

In approximately 96% of unintentional poisoning deaths nationally and 97% in New Jersey, drugs are the poison. This includes unintentional overdose, wrong drug given or taken in error, drug taken inadvertently, and mistakes in the use of drugs in medical and surgical procedures. Not included are cases where the correct drug was properly administered but had an unforeseen adverse effect such as an allergic reaction. There are a handful of alcohol poisoning and carbon monoxide poisoning deaths each year and even fewer due to exposure to other noxious substances.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

The unintentional poisoning death rate among New Jersey residents is 19% above that of the U.S. population as a whole.

What Is Being Done?

The [https://nj.gov/humanservices/dmhas/home/ Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services] promotes the prevention and treatment of substance disorders and supports the recovery of individuals affected by substance use disorder (SUD). The 2013 [http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2012/Bills/PL13/46_.HTM Overdose Prevention Act] (P.L. 2013, c.46) provides immunity from liability and professional discipline to health care professionals who prescribe, dispense, or administer naloxone (or any similarly acting and approved drug) in an emergency to an individual who the person believes is experiencing an opioid overdose. The Act also contains Good Samaritan provisions, which provide immunity from arrest and prosecution for drug possession to those non-health professional individuals who call 911 for suspected overdoses, and makes naloxone available to family members who could be taught to administer the drug in case of an emergency. The Health Commissioner expanded the scope of practice for Emergency Medical Technicians in 2014 to allow for the administration of [http://www.nj.gov/health/ems/ems-toolbox/ naloxone] in cases of life threatening opioid overdoses. The same year, the Governor established a program to train and equip police officers to administer naloxone. A 2015 law expanding the scope of the NJ Prescription Monitoring Program (NJPMP) requires all physicians and pharmacists practicing in NJ to register for access and mandates physicians to check the NJPMP when patients return for refills on opioid medications. A 2017 law ([http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2016/Bills/PL17/28_.HTM P.L. 2017, c.28]) set a five-day limit on initial prescriptions for opioids (reduced from seven days) and mandates that insurance companies accept those facing drug addiction into treatment for up to six months and without the need for prior coverage authorization. In 2016, NJDOH was awarded a CDC grant for [https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/foa/ddpi.html Prescription Drug Overdose: Data-Driven Prevention Initiative] (DDPI), with funding used to advance data collection and analysis, and to evaluate state-level actions that address opioid misuse, abuse, and overdose. The [https://www.state.nj.us/health/populationhealth/opioid/ NJ Overdose Data Dashboard] was developed under this project. In 2017, the NJDOH was awarded CDC funds for [https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/foa/state-opioid-mm.html Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance] (ESOOS), which leveraged the existing National Violent Death Reporting System data platform to collect additional toxicology, situation, and death scene data on fatal overdoses. In 2019, these programs were folded into CDC's [https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/od2a/index.html Overdose Data to Action] (OD2A), a cooperative agreement supporting 66 state, county, and local jurisdictions to use data to track and understand the complex nature of drug overdoses, and stresses data integration in developing and implementing effective overdose prevention programs. Since 2018, the Governor's Office has focused on inter-departmental strategies that include increasing access to treatment and harm-reduction resources, enhancing recovery support systems, implementing law enforcement strategies targeting the supply of illicit drugs, and strengthening systems and data infrastructure. In addition to NJDOH, other departments involved in these efforts include Department of Human Services, Department of Children and Families, Department of Labor, Office of the Attorney General, Division of Consumer Affairs, and Department of Corrections. Information on programs and policies implemented by state agencies or signed into law under this approach is included in [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/indicator/other_resources/PoisoningDth.html Other Resources] or as part of the [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/topic/SubstanceUse.html Substance Abuse Topic].

Available Services

NJ Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services: [https://nj.gov/humanservices/dmhas/home/] Poison Control: [http://www.njpies.org/] or 1-800-222-1222

Health Program Information

The Center for Health Statistics is a central source for injury statistics, including unintentional poisoning. Available data include emergency department data, inpatient hospitalization data, and mortality data: [http://www.state.nj.us/health/chs/njvdrs/] NJDOH Patient Safety Reporting System: [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/patient-safety-reporting-system/] NJDOH Environmental Public Health Tracking Program, Carbon Monoxide: [http://www.nj.gov/health/ceohs/public-health-tracking/human-exposure/#1]


Related Indicators

Related Risk Factors Indicators:


Related Health Status Outcomes Indicators:



Data Tables


Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Unintentional Poisoning by Year, New Jersey and the United States, 2000-2020

US/NJYearDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- ator
Record Count: 42
US20004.54.44.612,757
US20014.94.95.014,078
US20026.16.06.217,550
US20036.76.66.819,457
US20047.27.17.320,950
US20058.07.98.123,618
US20069.29.19.327,531
US20079.99.710.029,846
US200810.210.110.331,116
US200910.310.210.431,758
US201010.610.510.833,041
US201111.611.511.736,280
US201211.511.411.736,332
US201312.212.112.438,851
US201413.113.013.342,032
US201514.814.714.947,478
US201618.218.118.458,335
US201720.119.920.364,795
US201819.319.119.462,399
US201920.220.120.465,773
US202026.926.827.187,404
NJ20006.25.66.7527
NJ20016.76.17.2577
NJ20028.17.58.7704
NJ20037.26.67.8623
NJ20046.05.56.5520
NJ20058.47.89.0730
NJ20068.88.19.4759
NJ20077.77.18.3662
NJ20088.07.48.6707
NJ20098.57.99.1740
NJ20109.38.79.9822
NJ201110.810.211.5971
NJ201213.012.213.71,146
NJ201314.113.314.91,252
NJ201413.612.814.31,192
NJ201516.115.317.01,406
NJ201623.222.224.22,015
NJ201729.928.731.02,605
NJ201832.931.734.12,870
NJ201931.530.432.72,784
NJ202032.130.933.32,836

Data Notes

The Healthy People 2020 objective is for poisoning deaths caused by unintentional or undetermined intent and therefore is not comparable to the HNJ2020 objective. U.S. data shown are for unintentional poisoning only. This is Healthy New Jersey 2020 (HNJ2020) Objective IVP-6.

Data Sources

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Underlying Cause of Death File. CDC WONDER On-line Database accessed at [https://wonder.cdc.gov/Deaths-by-Underlying-Cause.html]
  • Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health
  • Population Estimates, [https://www.nj.gov/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html State Data Center], New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development


Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Unintentional Poisoning by Year and Race/Ethnicity, New Jersey, 2000-2020

Race/EthnicityYearDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- ator
Record Count: 84
White20006.65.97.2358
White20016.86.27.5378
White20028.78.09.5480
White20038.07.38.8430
White20046.76.07.4357
White20059.38.510.1490
White200610.910.011.8562
White20079.78.910.6494
White20089.99.010.7517
White200910.69.811.5538
White201012.611.713.6622
White201115.114.016.1755
White201218.417.319.6892
White201319.818.621.0950
White201419.318.120.5905
White201522.821.524.11,034
White201632.330.733.81,432
White201740.238.441.91,768
White201843.541.645.31,899
White201939.437.641.11,742
White202038.937.240.71,705
Black20009.88.011.7108
Black200112.110.114.1134
Black200214.011.816.2156
Black200311.69.613.6129
Black20049.07.210.7100
Black200515.513.217.8173
Black200612.110.014.1135
Black20079.77.911.6109
Black20088.46.710.195
Black200910.58.612.4120
Black201010.28.312.0119
Black20119.88.011.6117
Black201211.19.213.1133
Black201312.810.814.9153
Black201411.39.413.3137
Black201514.712.416.9180
Black201623.120.425.9285
Black201736.633.140.1458
Black201842.238.546.0519
Black201944.340.548.2555
Black202047.943.951.9603
Hispanic20004.93.66.258
Hispanic20014.93.76.261
Hispanic20025.54.26.967
Hispanic20034.63.45.859
Hispanic20044.43.25.554
Hispanic20054.43.25.559
Hispanic20064.03.05.154
Hispanic20073.42.54.448
Hispanic20085.94.67.281
Hispanic20095.14.06.375
Hispanic20104.73.75.871
Hispanic20115.24.16.387
Hispanic20126.55.37.7106
Hispanic20137.46.18.7122
Hispanic20147.36.08.6126
Hispanic20159.88.311.3169
Hispanic201614.512.816.3259
Hispanic201717.815.819.7319
Hispanic201821.319.223.4389
Hispanic201923.221.025.4433
Hispanic202024.422.226.6457
Asian2000**
Asian2001**
Asian2002**
Asian2003**
Asian2004**
Asian2005**
Asian2006**
Asian2007**
Asian2008**
Asian2009**
Asian2010**
Asian2011**
Asian2012**
Asian2013**
Asian2014**
Asian2015**
Asian2016**
Asian20172.81.73.925
Asian20182.41.33.421
Asian2019**
Asian20203.32.14.531

Data Notes

This is Healthy New Jersey 2020 (HNJ2020) Objective IVP-6. Data for White, Black, and Asian do not include Hispanics. Hispanic ethnicity includes persons of any race. **Too few deaths to calculate a reliable rate.

Data Sources

  • Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health
  • Population Estimates, [https://www.nj.gov/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html State Data Center], New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development


Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Unintentional Poisoning by Race/Ethnicity, New Jersey, 2020

Race/EthnicityDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- ator
Record Count: 6
White38.937.240.71,705
Black47.943.951.9603
Hispanic24.422.226.6457
Asian3.32.14.531
New Jersey32.130.933.32,836
United States26.926.827.187,404

Data Notes

Data for White, Black, and Asian do not include Hispanics. Hispanic ethnicity includes persons of any race.

Data Sources

  • Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health
  • Population Estimates, [https://www.nj.gov/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html State Data Center], New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development


Age-Adjusted Death Rate due to Unintentional Poisoning by County, New Jersey, 2020

CountyDeaths per 100,000 PopulationLower LimitUpper LimitNumer- ator
Record Count: 23
Atlantic63.053.472.6163
Bergen21.018.124.0184
Burlington33.428.138.8145
Camden54.247.860.6271
Cape May72.254.889.655
Cumberland53.241.465.075
Essex34.730.638.7297
Gloucester52.544.260.8144
Hudson21.618.125.1154
Hunterdon**11
Mercer33.727.839.7119
Middlesex25.221.728.6211
Monmouth31.527.135.9175
Morris20.616.624.696
Ocean45.039.750.3228
Passaic30.825.935.6156
Salem62.843.182.435
Somerset19.614.824.364
Sussex39.329.049.752
Union28.924.533.4167
Warren36.525.048.034
New Jersey32.130.933.32,836
United States26.926.827.187,404

Data Notes

** The number of deaths in Hunterdon County is too small to calculate a reliable rate.

Data Sources

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Underlying Cause of Death File. CDC WONDER On-line Database accessed at [https://wonder.cdc.gov/Deaths-by-Underlying-Cause.html]
  • Death Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health
  • Population Estimates, [https://www.nj.gov/labor/lpa/dmograph/est/est_index.html State Data Center], New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development

References and Community Resources

1. WISQARS, 2020 fatal and non-fatal injury data: [http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html] 2. CDC WONDER, 2000 and 2020 unintentional poisoning mortality: [https://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html] Additional information: *CDC National Center for Environmental Health: [https://www.cdc.gov/co/ Carbon Monoxide Poisoning] *CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: [https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/ Drug Overdose] *CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control [https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/od2a/index.html Overdose Data to Action (OD2A)] *[https://www.nj.gov/health/populationhealth/opioid/ NJ Overdose Data Dashboard] *[https://www.njoag.gov/programs/nj-cares/ NJCARES Opioid-Related Data and Information] *[https://www.njoag.gov/programs/nj-cares/operation-helping-hand/ NJ Operation Helping Hand] *[https://gcada.nj.gov/home/ NJ Governor's Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse] *[http://www.nj.gov/health/ems/ems-toolbox/ NJDOH Naloxone (Narcan) Program] *[https://www.state.nj.us/health/ems/trauma-informed_care/patient_focused_tic/ NJDOH Five Minutes to Help] *[https://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/dmahs/home/Comprehensive_Demonstration_Implementation_Protocol_OUD-SUD_Program.pdf NJDHS SUD Waiver Program] allows federal matching funds to be used for expanding substance use disorder treatment services *[https://www.nj.gov/health/integratedhealth/home/naloxone.shtml NJDOH Standing Order Program - Naloxone] *[https://www.nj.gov/labor/career-services/special-services/opioid-impacted/ NJDOL Pathways to Recovery] program *[https://www.njconsumeraffairs.gov/meddrop/Pages/default.aspx NJOAG/Division of Consumer Affairs Project Medicine Drop] In 2022, the Governor announced that New Jersey is set to receive $641 million from settlements with an opioid manufacturer and the country's 3 largest pharmaceutical distributors. Paid through 2038, the funds will support state and local programs focused on treatment, prevention, and other strategies to address the opioid issue in New Jersey. [https://www.nj.gov/governor/news/news/562022/20220311a.shtml] *[https://pub.njleg.gov/bills/2004/PL04/9_.pdf NJ Patient Safety Act (P.L. 2004, c. 9)] *[https://pub.njleg.gov/bills/2012/PL13/46_.pdf NJ Overdose Prevention Act (P.L. 2013, c. 46)] *[https://pub.njleg.gov/bills/2016/PL17/28_.pdf NJ Substance Abuse Disorder Law (P.L. 2017, c. 28)] *[https://pub.njleg.state.nj.us/Bills/2020/PL21/54_.PDF NJ Senate Bill No. 2323 (P.L. 2021, c.54)] : Prescribers required to co-prescribe naloxone or another opioid antidote for patients receiving high doses of opioids or certain drug combinations *[https://pub.njleg.state.nj.us/Bills/2020/PL21/152_.PDF NJ Senate Bill No. 3491 (P.L. 2021, c.152)]: Allow paramedics to carry and administer buprenorphine to treat acute opioid withdrawal symptoms after naloxone reversal *[https://pub.njleg.state.nj.us/Bills/2020/PL21/157_.PDF NJ Assembly Bill No. 5703 (P.L. 2021, c.157)]: Waiver of prior authorization requirements for medication-assisted treatment (MAT) *[https://pub.njleg.state.nj.us/Bills/2020/PL21/396_.PDF NJ Sente Bill No. 3009 (P.L. 2021, c.396)]: Expansion of Harm Reduction services to provide sterile syringes and additional support services to persons who use drugs intravenously *[https://pub.njleg.state.nj.us/Bills/2020/PL21/430_.PDF NJ Assembly Bill No. 798 (P.L. 2021, c.430)]: Establishes County and Local Overdose Fatality Review Teams (OFRTs)

Page Content Updated On 07/25/2022, Published on 07/25/2022
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