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Complete Health Indicator Report of Hospitalizations from or with Pneumoconiosis

Definition

Hospitalizations from or with pneumoconiosis as primary diagnosis for persons 15 years or older. ICD-9 codes: 500-505 ICD-10 codes: J60-J66

Numerator

Number of inpatient hospital discharges with a primary diagnosis of pneumoconiosis, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, asbestosis, silicosis, or other or unspecified pneumoconiosis.

Denominator

Total number of persons aged 15 years or older in the population.

Data Interpretation Issues

Because pneumoconioses are typically diseases of long latency, current incidence is not likely to be indicative of current exposure. It may be many years before reductions in occupational exposures affect the number of hospitalizations.

Why Is This Important?

Pneumoconiosis is a class of lung diseases which are usually incurable and may lead to death. Pneumoconioses includes silicosis, asbestosis, coal workers' pneumoconiosis, and other and unspecified pneumoconiosis. Nearly all pneumoconioses are attributable to occupational exposures and millions of workers are at risk. Complications of various pneumoconioses and other conditions associated with exposure to the same dusts that cause pneumoconiosis include respiratory infections (including tuberculosis); chronic bronchitis; emphysema; lung cancer; pleuritis; progressive systematic sclerosis; renal disease and respiratory failure.

How Are We Doing?

There have been over 26,000 cases of pneumoconioses in New Jersey (NJ) between 2000 and 2017. Of the reported cases of pneumoconiosis hospitalizations, 92% (24,377) were due to asbestosis. The NJ annual, age-standardized rate of asbestosis between 2000 and 2017 is 68.3-277 hospitalizations/million residents. Rates of asbestosis in NJ may be higher than other parts of the US because of the production of asbestos products and use of asbestos, especially in New Jersey's many shipyards. Several NJ studies have documented excess mesothelioma among NJ workers in industries with asbestos exposure, including New Jersey's most well-known asbestos products manufacturer, the Manville Corporation in Somerset County. The NJDOH has estimated that as many as 500,000 NJ workers may have been exposed to asbestos since 1940.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey law requires the reporting of the most common pneumoconiosis, including those that are coded as unspecified, by hospitals and health care providers (NJAC 8:58). Pneumoconioses frequency varies geographically and is largely determined by local industrial activities and migration of affected individuals. Control of occupational dust exposure is the single most effective means of preventing pneumoconiosis. Tracking of pneumoconiosis is essential for measuring progress towards elimination of the disease, as well as for targeting prevention and disease management programs. Because of the serious health effects that exposure to asbestos can cause, the handling of asbestos-containing materials is regulated in NJ. In NJ all asbestos abatement work must be conducted by a NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development (DOLWD) licensed asbestos abatement contractor. All of the contractor's employees who conduct asbestos abatement must have a valid NJ DOLWD supervisor or worker permit. All licensed contractors are required to submit notice to designated agencies of any asbestos abatement covered by NJAC 8:60 and NJAC 5:16 at least 10 days in advance of the beginning of the work. All schools are required to maintain asbestos management plans for each of their buildings. These plans are required to include the type and location of any asbestos in the building, regular updates on the condition of the asbestos and, if applicable, when it was abated (removed). The New Jersey Silicosis Outreach and Research (SOAR) Alliance is a multiple-partner team consisting of industry, labor, state (including the NJ Department of Health) and federal representatives whose mission is to address issues associated with silica exposure among New Jersey highway construction and repair workers. This is done by increasing awareness of the silicosis hazard, identifying exposure sources and promoting control measures to reduce exposure [http://nj.gov/health/workplacehealthandsafety/occupational-health-surveillance/silicosis/] The Occupational Health Surveillance Unit conducts surveillance for silicosis under the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Fundamental grant program. [http://www.nj.gov/health/workplacehealthandsafety/occupational-health-surveillance/statistics/nj_ohi.shtml]

Available Services

Additional information on the prevention of work-related injuries and illnesses can be obtained from: NJ Department of Health Occupational Health Surveillance Unit PO Box 369 Trenton, NJ 08625-0369 Phone: (609) 826-4984 Fax: (609) 826-4983 [http://nj.gov/health/workplacehealthandsafety/occupational-health-surveillance/]

Health Program Information

Asbestos is regulated by the NJ Departments of Health, Labor & Workforce Development, Community Affairs, and Environmental Protection as follows: Environmental and Occupational Health Assessment Program is the agency responsible for asbestos and environmental information; provides training and accreditation for asbestos training providers; conducts studies to evaluate asbestos abatement and management methods; and administers the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) and the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), on behalf of the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Phone: (609) 826-4950 Fax: (609) 826-4975 [http://www.nj.gov/health/ceohs/asbestos/] Public Employees Occupational Safety and Health (PEOSH) Unit enforces the occupational health regulations for public employees who work with asbestos-containing materials in general industry (General Industry Asbestos Standard, 29 CFR 1910.1001) and employees who work with asbestos-containing building materials during construction (Construction Asbestos Standard, 29 CFR 1926.1101) Phone: (609) 984-1863 Fax: (609) 984-2779 [http://nj.gov/health/workplacehealthandsafety/peosh/] NJ Department of Labor and Workforce Development (NJDLWD) Asbestos Control and Licensing licenses asbestos abatement contractors and issues performance permit identification cards to abatement workers and supervisors employed by those contractors; enforces the NJ Asbestos Control and Licensing Act (N.J.S.A. 34:5A-32 et seq.) by conducting inspections involving the abatement of friable and non-friable asbestos containing materials in all private, public, commercial and residential buildings in New Jersey, including those asbestos projects performed in schools and public buildings under the Asbestos Hazard Abatement Sub-Code; and investigates illegal or improper abatements in any type of building, and routinely inspects the work of licensed contractors and their employees. Phone: (609) 633-0664 Fax: (609) 633-0664 [http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/lsse/employee/asbestos_control_and_licensing.html] NJ Department of Community Affairs (NJDCA) -- Asbestosis/Lead Unit certifies asbestos safety technicians and authorizes asbestos safety control monitoring firms; enforces the provisions of the Asbestos Hazard Abatement Sub-Code (N.J.A.C. 5:23-8) which pertains to educational facilities, public buildings, daycare centers and nurseries; provides information and interpretation of the code on methods of asbestos remediation for projects under the jurisdiction of N.J.A.C. 5:23-8; investigates complaints and routinely inspects the work of monitors; issues asbestos permits for state-owned facilities; and issues variations to N.J.A.C. 5:23-8. Phone: (609) 633-6224 Fax: (609) 633-1040 [http://www.nj.gov/dca/divisions/codes/offices/asbestos.html] NJ Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) regulates the transportation and disposal of asbestos-containing materials and investigates reports of unregistered transporters and illegal disposal in concert with county health departments. Phone: (609) 633-1418 Fax: (609) 633-1112 [http://www.nj.gov/dep/dshw/rrtp/asbestos.htm]


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:



Data Tables


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, All Pneumoconiosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, 2000-2017

New Jersey vs. United StatesYearHospitalizations per Million ResidentsNumer- ator
Record Count: 29
New Jersey2000303.322,101
New Jersey2001286.571,985
New Jersey2002230.61,596
New Jersey2003230.61,628
New Jersey2004213.531,539
New Jersey2005232.31,610
New Jersey20062501,824
New Jersey20072731,893
New Jersey20082741,910
New Jersey20092421,698
New Jersey2010213.51,518
New Jersey2011190.41,360
New Jersey2012182.61,314
New Jersey20131591,150
New Jersey2014150.91,099
New Jersey2015113.1831
New Jersey201685.3624
New Jersey2017113.1835
United States2000146.531,755
United States2001116.225,710
United States2002151.132,795
United States200390.419,667
United States200412527,146
United States2005108.926,188
United States200686.120,799
United States200778.519,037
United States200878.919,097
United States200967.516,481
United States201041.710,262

Data Notes

All Pneumoconiosis: ICD-9-CM 500-505, ICD-10-CM J60-J66. Effective October 1, 2015 healthcare organizations and providers were required to start using ICD-10-CM codes. The transition in classification from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM may not be a one-to-one match, therefore caution should be taken when comparing data before and after the transition. The US 2000 Standard population ([http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt20.pdf]) was used to calculate the annual age-standardized death rate. Number of deaths in NJ and state census population data were broken down into the following age groups: 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 plus. US data for 2011-2017 are not available.

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, All Pneumoconiosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, by County, 2015-2017

CountyAge-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, per 1,000,000
Record Count: 21
Atlantic92.7
Bergen47
Burlington118.9
Camden238
Cape May160.8
Cumberland250
Essex20.1
Gloucester300.5
Hudson34.6
Hunterdon91.9
Mercer71.8
Middlesex66.4
Monmouth69.5
Morris93.7
Ocean81.9
Passaic59.4
Salem217.5
Somerset175.2
Sussex49.3
Union38.3
Warren90

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, Asbestosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, 2000-2017

New Jersey vs. United StatesYearHospitalizations per Million ResidentsNumer- ator
Record Count: 29
New Jersey20002771,919
New Jersey2001256.71,779
New Jersey20022031,406
New Jersey2003199.91,437
New Jersey20041911,377
New Jersey2005202.91,407
New Jersey2006225.41,643
New Jersey20072361,720
New Jersey20082551,777
New Jersey20092141,613
New Jersey2010189.41,442
New Jersey2011169.71,306
New Jersey2012159.51,259
New Jersey2013137.21,100
New Jersey2014127.51,047
New Jersey201593.7788
New Jersey201668.3573
New Jersey201790.1784
United States200093.320,223
United States20018418,523
United States2002103.222,441
United States200354.611,862
United States200498.221,312
United States200560.214,570
United States200660.914,416
United States200761.714,841
United States200870.116,876
United States200948.311,810
United States201033.28,123

Data Notes

Asbestosis: ICD-9-CM 501, ICD-10-CM J61. Effective October 1, 2015 healthcare organizations and providers were required to start using ICD-10-CM codes. The transition in classification from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM may not be a one-to-one match, therefore caution should be taken when comparing data before and after the transition. The US 2000 Standard population ([http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt20.pdf]) was used to calculate the annual age-standardized death rate. Number of deaths in NJ and state census population data were broken down into the following age groups: 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 plus. US data for 2011-2017 are not available.

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, Asbestosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, by County, 2015-2017

CountyAge-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, per 1,000,000
Record Count: 21
Atlantic87.2
Bergen45.2
Burlington114.3
Camden233.6
Cape May166.9
Cumberland232.4
Essex17.7
Gloucester293.7
Hudson33.3
Hunterdon86.9
Mercer64.1
Middlesex65.7
Monmouth66.7
Morris33.9
Ocean102
Passaic57.7
Salem196
Somerset175.2
Sussex47.8
Union34.7
Warren85

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]
  • U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, 2000-2017

New Jersey vs. United StatesYearHospitalizations per Million ResidentsNumer- ator
Record Count: 29
New Jersey200017.6121
New Jersey200119.6135
New Jersey200218124
New Jersey200318.3131
New Jersey200415.4110
New Jersey200521.1146
New Jersey200618.2134
New Jersey200718.6140
New Jersey20089.365
New Jersey20096.347
New Jersey20104.334
New Jersey20113.125
New Jersey20123.629
New Jersey20132.318
New Jersey20141.713
New Jersey20151.413
New Jersey201618
New Jersey20171.312
United States200044.99,715
United States2001286,236
United States200240.18,657
United States200330.36,590
United States200424.65,343
United States2005399,347
United States200615.43,853
United States20078.62,182
United States20085.11,346
United States20098.92,224
United States20102.6670

Data Notes

Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis: ICD-9-CM 500, ICD-10-CM J60. Effective October 1, 2015 healthcare organizations and providers were required to start using ICD-10-CM codes. The transition in classification from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM may not be a one-to-one match, therefore caution should be taken when comparing data before and after the transition. The US 2000 Standard population ([http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt20.pdf]) was used to calculate the annual age-standardized death rate. Number of deaths in NJ and state census population data were broken down into the following age groups: 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 plus. US data for 2011-2017 are not available.

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, Silicosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, 2000-2017

New Jersey vs. United StatesYearHospitalizations per Million ResidentsNumer- ator
Record Count: 29
New Jersey20006.847
New Jersey20016.243
New Jersey20027.149
New Jersey20036.345
New Jersey20045.540
New Jersey20056.746
New Jersey20065.540
New Jersey20076.748
New Jersey20086.243
New Jersey20093.626
New Jersey20104.434
New Jersey20113.124
New Jersey20122.723
New Jersey20132.723
New Jersey20143.428
New Jersey20151.615
New Jersey20163.226
New Jersey20173.228
United States20005.21,128
United States20011.3289
United States20028.21,792
United States20034.1892
United States20045.21,132
United States20053.1754
United States20064.11,033
United States20072.5630
United States20083.7875
United States20099.92,348
United States20101.2249

Data Notes

Silicosis: ICD-9-CM 502, ICD-10-CM J62. Effective October 1, 2015 healthcare organizations and providers were required to start using ICD-10-CM codes. The transition in classification from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM may not be a one-to-one match, therefore caution should be taken when comparing data before and after the transition. The US 2000 Standard population ([http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt20.pdf]) was used to calculate the annual age-standardized death rate. Number of deaths in NJ and state census population data were broken down into the following age groups: 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 plus. US data for 2011-2017 are not available.

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]


Annual Age-Standardized Hospitalization Rate, Other and Unspecified Pneumoconiosis Among NJ Residents Age 15 Years and Older, 2000-2017

New Jersey vs. United StatesYearHospitalizations per Million ResidentsNumer- ator
Record Count: 29
New Jersey20003.222
New Jersey20014.128
New Jersey20023.222
New Jersey20033.223
New Jersey20042.418
New Jersey20051.712
New Jersey20062.317
New Jersey20073.122
New Jersey20083.625
New Jersey2009215
New Jersey20101.29
New Jersey201118
New Jersey201217
New Jersey20131.816
New Jersey20141.612
New Jersey2015218
New Jersey2016217
New Jersey20171.411
United States20004.4952
United States20013.2709
United States20020.6128
United States20031.9418
United States20040.9199
United States20057.41,689
United States20065.71,497
United States20075.91,409
United States2008**
United States20090.499
United States20104.71,220

Data Notes

Other and Unspecified Pneumoconiosis: ICD-9-CM 503-505, ICD-10-CM J63-J66. Effective October 1, 2015 healthcare organizations and providers were required to start using ICD-10-CM codes. The transition in classification from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM may not be a one-to-one match, therefore caution should be taken when comparing data before and after the transition. The US 2000 Standard population ([http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/statnt/statnt20.pdf]) was used to calculate the annual age-standardized death rate. Number of deaths in NJ and state census population data were broken down into the following age groups: 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64, 65-74, 75-84, and 85 plus. US data for 2008 and 2011-2017 are not available.

Data Sources

  • U.S. Census Bureau
  • Uniform Billing Patient Summary, Division of Health Care Quality and Assessment, New Jersey Department of Health, [http://www.nj.gov/health/healthcarequality/health-care-professionals/njddcs/]

Page Content Updated On 03/08/2019, Published on 03/11/2019
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 23 November 2020 14:37:19 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

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