Skip directly to searchSkip directly to the site navigationSkip directly to the page's main content

Important Facts for Childhood Immunizations

Definition

Percentage of young children who received effective vaccination coverage levels for universally recommended vaccines by a given age

Numerator

Number of children of a given age* who received the recommended doses of universally recommended vaccines (*19 to 35 months of age (2010-2017) or 24 months of age (2018-2020) for all except Hepatitis B birth dose between 0 and 3 days old)

Denominator

Total number of children of a given age* (*19 to 35 months of age (2010-2017) or 24 months of age (2018-2020) for all except Hepatitis B birth dose between 0 and 3 days old)

Why Is This Important?

Immunizations are the one of most cost-effective health prevention measures. Development of vaccinations was cited by the U.S. Public Health Service as one of the [https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00056796.htm Ten Great Public Health Achievements in the 20th Century]. Vaccines play an essential role in reducing and eliminating disease.

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of children aged 19 to 35 months who receive the recommended doses of DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, hepatitis B, varicella and PCV vaccines

U.S. Target: 80 percent
State Target: 80 percent

Other Objectives

'''Healthy New Jersey 2020 Objective IMM-1''': Increase effective vaccination coverage levels for universally recommended vaccines among young children:[[br]] '''IMM-1a''': Four (4) doses diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine by age 19 to 35 months (2010-2017) or 24 months (2018-2020) to 95%.[[br]] '''IMM-1b''': Birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine (0 to 3 days between birth date and date of vaccination, reported by annual birth cohort) to 75%.[[br]] '''IMM-1c''': Four (4) doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) among children by age 19 to 35 months (2010-2017) or 24 months (2018-2020) to 90%. '''Healthy New Jersey 2020 Objective IMM-2''': Increase the percentage of children aged 19 to 35 months (2010-2017) or 24 months (2018-2020) who receive the recommended doses of DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, hepatitis B, varicella and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) to 80%.[[br]] Recommended doses are: 4 DTaP, 3 Polio, 1 MMR, full series of Hib (3 or 4 doses depending on type), 3+ HepB, 1+ Var, and 4+ PCV.

How Are We Doing?

The coverage rate for the hepatitis B vaccination birth dose increased 44% between 2010 and 2018. The DTaP and PCV vaccination coverage rates have not changed much since 2010. The proportion of children in the U.S. and in New Jersey who received the recommended doses of DTaP, polio, MMR, Hib, hepatitis B, varicella and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was fairly constant between 2011 and 2018.

How Do We Compare With the U.S.?

New Jersey's coverage rate for the full recommended vaccine series is about the same as that of the nation as a whole.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health's [https://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/vpdp.shtml Vaccine Preventable Disease Program] (VPDP) conducts annual assessments of private and public health care providers' immunization records, as well as, Local Health Departments conducting audits of the immunization records in licensed preschools/daycares and schools to obtain current state immunization coverage levels from the vaccination records submitted by attendees on entry. New Jersey also implemented the On Time Every Time: Keys to Prevention Immunization Initiative to encourage providers to vaccinate a child with all of the childhood immunizations by 12 months of age. New Jersey has a coalition that works to maintain or improve immunization coverage levels and to increase public awareness of immunizations. The [https://njiis.nj.gov/njiis/ NJ Immunization Information System] (NJIIS) provides a mechanism for medical providers to keep track of patient immunizations, and to send reminder cards/letters to NJ parents whose children are due for immunizations. NJIIS also archives adult immunizations such as pneumovax, tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (TdaP); influenza; smallpox; Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (HPV), and Hepatitis A and B. Located statewide are 45 Community Public Health Clinics, 78 Federally Qualified Health Centers and 127 Local Health Departments that provide immunizations services for those who meet the [https://www.state.nj.us/health/cd/documents/vpdp/vfc_brochure.pdf Vaccines For Children] (VFC) Program eligibility criteria of being either Medicaid eligible, NJ FamilyCare insured, uninsured, or underinsured.
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sat, 28 November 2020 20:41:57 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

Content updated: no date