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Complete Health Indicator Report of Ozone in Outdoor Air

Definition

Days (and person-days) in which the average concentration of ozone in outdoor air exceeds the regulatory standard at an ozone monitoring point

Numerator

Number of days in a year in which the ozone concentration at a monitor exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), averaged over an 8-hour period; or exceeded the NAAQS of 0.12 ppm, averaged over a 1-hour period; or number of person-days, which is the product of the number of days with an ozone exceedance times the population of the geographic area (county) represented by a monitor.

Denominator

Not applicable

Why Is This Important?

Ozone is an odorless, colorless gas that forms both in the air at ground level and in the Earth's upper atmosphere (the stratosphere). Ground-level ozone forms when precursor pollutants that come from cars, power plants, and other sources react with each other in heat and sunlight. While ozone in the stratosphere creates a layer that protects us from the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, ozone at ground level may irritate and damage the lungs, and harm human health in other ways. The federal health-based standard for ozone in outdoor air was 0.075 parts per million (ppm) averaged over an 8-hour period until December 2015, at which time it was lowered to 0.070 ppm.

Other Objectives

Objective 3A-2: Reduce the number of unhealthful days attributable to ozone to zero.

How Are We Doing?

New Jersey has an extensive system of monitors to evaluate the quality of outdoor air. Twelve monitor sites operate year round, and 3 are operated only during the ozone season (April 1st through October 31st): Colliers Mills (Ocean County); Monmouth University (Monmouth County); and Ramapo (Bergen County). Over the years, air quality in New Jersey has been improving. More stringent federal health-based standards for both ozone and particulates, were promulgated in 1997, and require states to do more to protect human health. New Jersey's air monitoring program evaluates hourly air quality readings using the national methodology called the Air Quality Index (AQI). The AQI uses five of the six pollutants for which there are national health-based standards (ground-level ozone, particulates, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide) and compares the composite pollutant levels to the federal standards in order to assign an air quality rating such as "good" or "unhealthy".

What Is Being Done?

Under the federal Clean Air Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has set health-based standards for ozone in the air we breathe. The USEPA and state and local governments have instituted a variety of multi-faceted programs to meet these health-based standards. The NJDEP has adopted rules to reduce emissions of VOCs from consumer products and establish requirements that apply to manufacturers, distributors, suppliers and retailers of VOCs. Beginning January 1, 2009, New Jersey implemented the California Low Emission Vehicle (CLEV) program. Non-regulatory programs also encourage communities to adopt practices such as carpooling to reduce harmful emissions. The NJDEP has also planted thousands of shade trees in urban areas to absorb and reduce ozone and NOx, lower temperatures, and reduce energy demand and emissions from energy generation. Success story: Recommendations for Reducing Smog Throughout NJ and Beyond [http://www.nj.gov/health/ceohs/documents/epht/tra_action/reducing_smog_in_nj.pdf] Success story: Air Quality and Asthma in NJ Children [http://www.nj.gov/health/ceohs/documents/epht/tra_action/helping_children_breathe_easier.pdf] Success story: Collaborating to Diminish Smog and Improve Health in NJ [http://www.nj.gov/health/ceohs/documents/epht/tra_action/clean_air_nj.pdf]

Available Services

The NJDEP's Bureau of Air Monitoring measures air pollution levels in New Jersey around the clock and compares them to national health standards. Updates and forecasts are sent to the wire services and other media, and health advisories are also issued when air pollution reaches unhealthful levels. The NJDEP's Bureau of Air Monitoring web site contains information on current air quality as well as historic trends. The web site is: [http://www.njaqinow.net/] The USEPA compiles air quality data from around the country and presents it to the public on the following web site: [http://www.airnow.gov] The NJDEP will notify interested people and organizations via e-mail when unhealthy air quality is forecast. To sign up for this service, send an e-mail message to majordomo@listserv.state.nj.us with one line in the message body (not in the subject): subscribe airadvisory. You will get two messages in reply; copy the authorization line from the "Confirmation" message and send it as the only line in your message, back to majordomo@listserv.state.nj.us. Throughout the summer, as part of the nightly news, local TV networks freqeuently broadcast a map showing the next day's air quality forecast for the different regions of the state. Check your TV listings for channel information.


Related Indicators

Related Relevant Population Characteristics Indicators:



Data Tables


Ozone in Outdoor Air, Number of Unhealthy Days with Ozone above 8-Hour Standard, by Year, 2000-2016

YearNumber of DaysNote
Record Count: 17
200018Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200134Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200245Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200317Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200413Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200523Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200620Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200723Based on 0.08 ppm standard
200830Based on 0.075 ppm standard
20099Based on 0.075 ppm standard
201035Based on 0.075 ppm standard
201121Based on 0.075 ppm standard
201223Based on 0.075 ppm standard
201310Based on 0.075 ppm standard
20143Based on 0.075 ppm standard
201532Based on 0.070 ppm standard
201625Based on 0.070 ppm standard

Data Notes

Target is 0 days with ozone above standard. Values for years 2000-2007 are based upon the old 8-hour ozone standard of 0.08ppm. Values for years 2008-2014 reflect the 8-hour ozone standard of 0.075 ppm. Values from 2015 forward reflect the 8-hour ozone standard of 0.070 ppm. NJ Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Air Monitoring.

Data Source

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)


Ozone in Outdoor Air, Number of Unhealthy Days with Ozone above 1-Hour Standard (0.12ppm), by Year, 2000-2016

YearNumber of Days
Record Count: 17
20004
200111
200216
20034
20040
20055
20063
20073
20080
20090
20101
20110
20120
20130
20140
20150
20160

Data Notes

Target is 0 days with ozone above standard. Data retreived October 31, 2017 from NJ Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Air Monitoring.

Data Source

Bureau of Air Monitoring, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection


Ozone in Outdoor Air, Number of Days Ozone Exceeded 0.075 ppm, by County, 2012-2016

NJ CountiesYearNumber of Days Exceeded 0.075 ppm
Record Count: 75
Atlantic20124
Atlantic20132
Atlantic20140
Atlantic20152
Atlantic20161
Bergen20121
Bergen20131
Bergen20141
Bergen201511
Bergen20168
Camden201220
Camden20130
Camden20141
Camden201513
Camden20169
Cumberland201210
Cumberland20130
Cumberland20140
Cumberland20152
Cumberland20161
Essex20127
Essex20131
Essex20140
Essex20155
Essex20163
Gloucester201216
Gloucester20131
Gloucester20141
Gloucester20155
Gloucester20167
Hudson20123
Hudson20130
Hudson20142
Hudson201516
Hudson20162
Hunterdon20126
Hunterdon20131
Hunterdon20140
Hunterdon20154
Hunterdon20167
Mercer201211
Mercer20132
Mercer20142
Mercer201510
Mercer201613
Middlesex201211
Middlesex20130
Middlesex20142
Middlesex20155
Middlesex201612
Monmouth201210
Monmouth20133
Monmouth20141
Monmouth20156
Monmouth20163
Morris20124
Morris20132
Morris20140
Morris20153
Morris20163
Ocean20129
Ocean20131
Ocean20141
Ocean20159
Ocean20166
Passaic20121
Passaic20131
Passaic20140
Passaic20157
Passaic20165
Warren20121
Warren20130
Warren20140
Warren20151
Warren20163

Data Notes

Not all New Jersey counties have a monitoring station for ozone. Only those counties with monitoring stations are listed.

Data Source

Bureau of Air Monitoring, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection


Ozone in Outdoor Air, Days with Ozone Exceeding 0.075 ppm, by Year and County, 2001-2016

NJ CountiesYearNumber of Days Exceeded 0.075 ppm
Record Count: 192
Atlantic200118
Atlantic200222
Atlantic200311
Atlantic20044
Atlantic200513
Atlantic20064
Atlantic20077
Atlantic20081
Atlantic20091
Atlantic20106
Atlantic20112
Atlantic20124
Atlantic20132
Atlantic20140
Atlantic20150
Atlantic20160
Bergen200123
Bergen200231
Bergen200310
Bergen20046
Bergen200517
Bergen20069
Bergen20076
Bergen20086
Bergen20092
Bergen20105
Bergen201110
Bergen20131
Bergen20141
Camden200139
Camden200247
Camden200323
Camden200410
Camden200531
Camden200620
Camden200727
Camden200816
Camden20090
Camden201016
Camden20118
Camden201220
Camden20130
Camden20141
Cumberland200122
Cumberland200231
Cumberland200310
Cumberland20046
Cumberland200513
Cumberland20069
Cumberland200710
Cumberland20088
Cumberland20091
Cumberland20106
Cumberland20112
Cumberland201210
Cumberland20130
Cumberland20140
Essex200215
Essex20109
Essex20118
Essex20127
Essex20131
Essex20140
Gloucester200125
Gloucester200238
Gloucester200314
Gloucester20049
Gloucester200512
Gloucester200613
Gloucester200712
Gloucester200817
Gloucester20091
Gloucester201014
Gloucester201111
Gloucester201216
Gloucester20131
Gloucester20141
Hudson200116
Hudson200220
Hudson20037
Hudson20045
Hudson200512
Hudson200610
Hudson200712
Hudson20087
Hudson20090
Hudson20106
Hudson20115
Hudson20123
Hudson20142
Hunterdon200129
Hunterdon200235
Hunterdon200310
Hunterdon200415
Hunterdon200522
Hunterdon20069
Hunterdon200721
Hunterdon200813
Hunterdon20092
Hunterdon20109
Hunterdon20117
Hunterdon20126
Hunterdon20131
Hunterdon20140
Mercer200129
Mercer200242
Mercer200316
Mercer20048
Mercer200518
Mercer200614
Mercer200717
Mercer200810
Mercer20090
Mercer201015
Mercer20119
Mercer201211
Mercer20132
Mercer20142
Middlesex200130
Middlesex200245
Middlesex200317
Middlesex20046
Middlesex200521
Middlesex200613
Middlesex200725
Middlesex200813
Middlesex20090
Middlesex201015
Middlesex201111
Middlesex201211
Middlesex20130
Middlesex20142
Monmouth200121
Monmouth200229
Monmouth200318
Monmouth20048
Monmouth200518
Monmouth20067
Monmouth200715
Monmouth200810
Monmouth20092
Monmouth20106
Monmouth20118
Monmouth201210
Monmouth20133
Monmouth20141
Morris200131
Morris200241
Morris200310
Morris20042
Morris200511
Morris200620
Morris200721
Morris20089
Morris20091
Morris20105
Morris20116
Morris20124
Morris20132
Morris20140
Ocean200133
Ocean200241
Ocean200319
Ocean200422
Ocean200526
Ocean200618
Ocean200716
Ocean200815
Ocean20092
Ocean201016
Ocean201111
Ocean20129
Ocean20131
Ocean20141
Passaic200117
Passaic200220
Passaic20036
Passaic20043
Passaic200512
Passaic20064
Passaic200713
Passaic20084
Passaic20090
Passaic20104
Passaic20113
Passaic20121
Passaic20131
Passaic20140
Warren20111
Warren20121
Warren20130
Warren20140

Data Source

Bureau of Air Monitoring, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection


Ozone in Outdoor Air, Number of Person-Days Ozone exceeded 0.075 ppm, by County, 2012-2016

NJ CountiesYearNumber of Person-Days
Record Count: 75
Atlantic20121,101,688
Atlantic2013552,334
Atlantic20140
Atlantic2015548,438
Atlantic2016270,991
Bergen2012918,888
Bergen2013927,434
Bergen2014933,572
Bergen201510,323,566
Bergen20167,513,208
Camden201210,270,780
Camden20130
Camden2014511,038
Camden20156,641,999
Camden20164,591,350
Cumberland20121,577,850
Cumberland20130
Cumberland20140
Cumberland2015311,708
Cumberland2016153,797
Essex20125,514,208
Essex2013792,091
Essex20140
Essex20153,987,170
Essex20162,390,742
Gloucester20124,633,376
Gloucester2013289,940
Gloucester2014290,951
Gloucester20151,457,395
Gloucester20162,046,310
Hudson20121,956,906
Hudson20130
Hudson20141,338,230
Hudson201510,797,376
Hudson20161,355,966
Hunterdon2012762,300
Hunterdon2013126,473
Hunterdon20140
Hunterdon2015501,952
Hunterdon2016872,732
Mercer20124,051,333
Mercer2013742,104
Mercer2014743,074
Mercer20153,713,980
Mercer20164,823,299
Middlesex20129,053,451
Middlesex20130
Middlesex20141,672,594
Middlesex20154,204,500
Middlesex201610,044,876
Monmouth20126,293,840
Monmouth20131,888,707
Monmouth2014629,279
Monmouth20153,772,290
Monmouth20161,877,538
Morris20121,991,996
Morris2013999,344
Morris20140
Morris20151,498,527
Morris20161,495,269
Ocean20125,224,230
Ocean2013583,412
Ocean2014586,301
Ocean20155,298,489
Ocean20163,554,982
Passaic2012502,885
Passaic2013506,998
Passaic20140
Passaic20153,576,412
Passaic20162,539,725
Warren2012107,653
Warren20130
Warren20140
Warren2015106,869
Warren2016319,851

Data Notes

Not all New Jersey counties have a monitoring station for ozone. Only those counties with monitoring stations are listed.

Data Source

Bureau of Air Monitoring, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

References and Community Resources

Ground-level ozone can lower your resistance to infections such as colds and pneumonia. It can also damage lung tissue, intensify heart and lung diseases (such as asthma), and cause coughing and throat irritation. When ozone reaches unhealthy levels, children and people with asthma are most at risk, but even healthy adults doing heavy exercise or labor outdoors may experience the effects of ozone. Individuals should try to limit outdoor activities when ozone reaches unhealthy levels. Ozone pollution is a concern during the summer months because strong sunlight and hot weather result in elevated levels of harmful ozone concentrations in the air we breathe. Many urban and suburban areas throughout the United States experience high levels of ground-level ozone. Many rural areas of the country are also subject to high ozone levels as winds carry emissions hundreds of miles away from their original sources. In New Jersey, all counties experience unhealthy ozone levels during the summer months. All of us can help reduce air pollution that can lead to ozone formation. Throughout the summer ozone season, you should: - Properly maintain your vehicle to comply with air pollution standards - Make sure your car's gas cap fits properly - Refuel cars after dusk - Do not "top off" your tank - Avoid unnecessary trips or consolidate trips - Limit idling your car - Carpool or use public transportation - Limit the use of gasoline powered mowers - Use water-based paints - Barbecue without starter fluid NJDEP "What's in My Community?" mapping application: [https://njdep.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=76194937cbbe46b1ab9a9ec37c7d709b] On the map you will find every facility with an air permit registered with the Division of Air Quality at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

Page Content Updated On 05/09/2019, Published on 05/09/2019
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Sun, 15 September 2019 12:46:23 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

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