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Health Indicator Report of Feeding at Discharge

Breastfeeding is the best source of nutrition for most infants. It can also reduce the risk for some short- and long-term health conditions for both infants and mothers.[https://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/about-breastfeeding/index.html ^1^]

Notes

Between July, 2014 and June, 2015, the New Jersey Department of Health rolled out a new birth certificate data collection system. In the old system, Feeding at Discharge was defined as "the type of feedings given in the 24 hours prior to discharge" with four possible entries: breast feeding, formula feeding, combination, and other (e.g., intravenously). In the new system, there are two questions: (1) Is infant being breastfed at time of discharge, referring to the infant suckling on the mother's breast, and (2) Exclusive breast milk through entire stay, referring to whether the infant was fed only breast milk regardless of the method. Both questions have yes/no responses. If the first question is yes, then feeding is breast. If the first question is yes and the second is no, then feeding is combination. If both answers are no, then feeding is formula. This change in data collection renders pre-2014 and post-2015 data incomparable.

Data Source

Birth Certificate Database, Office of Vital Statistics and Registry, New Jersey Department of Health

Data Interpretation Issues

Between July, 2014 and June, 2015, the New Jersey Department of Health rolled out a new birth certificate data collection system. In the old system, Feeding at Discharge was defined as "the type of feedings given in the 24 hours prior to discharge" with four possible entries: breast feeding, formula feeding, combination, and other (e.g., intravenously). In the new system, there are two questions: (1) Is infant being breastfed at time of discharge, referring to the infant suckling on the mother's breast, and (2) Exclusive breast milk through entire stay, referring to whether the infant was fed only breast milk regardless of the method. Both questions have yes/no responses. If the first question is yes, then feeding is breast. If the first question is yes and the second is no, then feeding is combination. If both answers are no, then feeding is formula. This change in data collection renders pre-2014 and post-2015 data incomparable.

Definition

The type of feedings given to an infant in the 24 hours prior to discharge from the hospital. (See Data Interpretation Issues section for more information.)

Numerator

Number of feeding type-specific live births

Denominator

Total number of live births

Healthy People Objective: Increase the proportion of infants who are breastfed

U.S. Target: Ever: 81.9%, Exclusively Through 3 Months: 46.2%, Exclusively Through 6 Months: 25.5%
State Target: Ever: 85%, Exclusively Through 3 Months: 45%, Exclusively Through 6 Months: 25.5%

Available Services

NJDOH Breastfeeding Info: [http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/wic/nutrition-breastfeeding/] [https://www.womenshealth.gov/about-us/what-we-do/programs-and-activities/helpline#:~:text=Do%20you%20have%20a%20women's,specialist%20in%20English%20or%20Spanish. National Breastfeeding Helpline] in both English and Spanish: 1-800-994-9662
Page Content Updated On 08/13/2021, Published on 08/13/2021
The information provided above is from the Department of Health's NJSHAD web site (https://nj.gov/health/shad). The information published on this website may be reproduced without permission. Please use the following citation: " Retrieved Mon, 04 July 2022 1:53:25 from Department of Health, New Jersey State Health Assessment Data Web site: https://nj.gov/health/shad ".

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